Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Refuse the Hour Begins No Boundaries at Yale

Yale Repertory Theatre’s 2015–16 No Boundaries performance series begins with the multimedia chamber opera Refuse the Hour, conceived and with a libretto by William Kentridge, music composed by Philip Miller, choreography by Dada Masilo, video design by Catherine Meyburgh and Kentridge, and dramaturgy by Peter Galison, on Friday, Nov. 6 at 8 pm and Saturday, Nov, 7 at 2 pm at the University Theatre, 222 York St., New Haven.

In this multimedia chamber opera, renowned South African artist Kentridge joins forces with a composer, a choreographer, a video designer, and a physicist to deliver an astonishing collision of art and performance. Sharing the stage with a menagerie of strange machines of his own invention, along with singers, dancers, and musicians, Kentridge conjures a stunning and profound exploration of the nature of time.  Refuse the Hour is co-sponsored by the Andrew Carnduff Ritchie Fund, Yale Center for British Art, Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Yale Repertory Theatre, Yale School of Music, and Yale University Art Gallery.

Tickets are $50–70: yalerep.org; 203-432-1234; Box Office, 1120 Chapel St. Student tickets are $25.

Refuse the Hour is the chamber opera companion to Kentridge’s five-channel video installation The Refusal of Time. Q and A sessions will be held immediately following each performance.

PERIPHERAL THINKING

William Kentridge

Sunday, Nov. 8 at 3 pm (Doors Open at 2)

Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

In this lecture, William Kentridge examines opportunities for learning from the edges and talks about his current project, Notes Towards a Model Opera. Free and open to the public; space is limited. Followed by a reception. Generously sponsored by the Andrew Carnduff Ritchie Fund.


EXHIBIT
Now through January 2016

Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

In his work, Kentridge employs a variety of media—including drawing, animation, sound, and video—to reflect on larger themes such as violence, fear, the relationship between text and image, and the legacies of art, literature, and science. Two video installations, What Will Come (2007) and NO, IT IS (2012), along with a selection of prints by the artist showcase his masterful approach to exploring these themes.

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Lauren Yarger with playwright Alfred Uhry at the Mark Twain House. Photo: Jacques Lamarre)

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